Wyoming Secretary Of State Files Amicus Brief Supporting Trump

While some secretaries of states are looking to remove former President Donald Trump’s name from their states’ ballots, Wyoming Secretary of State Chuck Gray is supporting the GOP presidential candidate’s efforts to fight the moves.

In support of Trump’s appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court to overrule the Colorado Supreme Court’s decision to kick him off the ballot, Gray submitted an amicus brief arguing that the Colorado Supreme Court’s ruling is not only “wrongfully decided” but also “unconstitutional.”

The brief, filed on behalf of Gray by America First Legal and Stone Hilton PLLC, stated that Trump did not engage in insurrection on Jan. 6, 2021 nor did he give aid to the enemies of the United States.

The Republican secretary of state also pointed out that Trump was not an officer of the United States, but president. Hence, he argues that the 14th Amendment cannot be invoked against the GOP frontrunner.

“As Secretaries of State, we must stop the radical Left’s unAmerican and unconstitutional attempts to weaponize the Fourteenth Amendment against Trump and the American People,” he stated.

He added that he has received “repeated attacks” from the radical left-wing media for his support for Trump. However, he plans to “continue to unapologetically defend the truth and ensure that the people of Wyoming can choose who to elect for themselves.”

Gray further stated in the filing that his interest in the case despite it not being his state is borne out of concern that millions of voters would be disenfranchised by the Colorado Supreme Court’s decision.

Speaking to Fox News about his efforts to ensure Trump’s name is left on the Colorado ballot, Gray called on other secretaries of states to join him.

“We must stop, as secretaries of state, the radical left’s un-American and unconstitutional attempts to weaponize the 14th Amendment against Trump and the American people. And we’re going to keep working as we have to ensure that Trump will go on the ballot,” he said.

The Supreme Court will be hearing arguments on Trump’s appeal on Feb. 8. With Colorado’s primary less than two months away, Trump himself filed a brief to the higher court on Thursday, urging the justices to overrule his removal from the ballot.

According to him, upholding his removal from the ballot would lead to “chaos,” as the filing reads, ​​“The court should put a swift and decisive end to these ballot-disqualification efforts, which threaten to disenfranchise tens of millions of Americans and which promise to unleash chaos and bedlam if other state courts and state officials follow Colorado’s lead and exclude the likely Republican presidential nominee from their ballots.”