Sununu Thinks Trump Is Nervous Of Losing Support

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu said that former President Donald Trump’s tough stance on immigration is a way to keep his supporters as he is “nervous his base is going to leave him.”

During an appearance on CNN on Tuesday, Sununu stated that the remarks Trump has been making about illegal immigrants are his way of covering up his failures and salvage his dwindling support.

“Everyone knows Donald Trump’s record. You know, as Republicans, we want that border secure. You know, we want the right fiscal policies in place. We wanted to drain the swamp. He didn’t do any of it. And there’s no, you don’t even have to run ads on that. He just didn’t get it done,” he stated.

“You know, it’s funny when you he was here over the weekend, and he spent all this time saying this, this horrible, you know, rhetoric against illegal immigrants and all this sort of thing. And all he’s doing there is trying to spur up his base,” he added. “He’s nervous his base is going to leave him at this point. That’s why he gets so extreme in some of these speeches he’s giving. And he does it around the immigration issue because he doesn’t want people to remember. By the way, you were there for four years, buddy.”

Sununu went on to state that Trump had the chance to secure the border but didn’t. “You had a chance to make Mexico pay for it, as you told us you would. You didn’t do any of it,” he stated, adding that Trump is “doing everything he can to distract from the fact, almost like he wasn’t president.”

“He was in charge for four years, and look what didn’t get done. So he’s he’s running scared. He knows that he doesn’t have any momentum,” he concluded.

Sununu’s remarks follow Trump’s recent comments during a speech in New Hampshire last weekend. While speaking against the continued influx of illegal immigrants into the U.S., the GOP front runner had stated that the immigrants are “poisoning the blood of our country.”

“They poison mental institutions and prisons all over the world, not just in South America, not just to three or four countries that we think about, but all over the world. They’re coming into our country from Africa, from Asia, all over the world,” he added.